Milk cooling on farms

Fast and efficient milk cooling on farms by using ice water from our BUCO ice bank systems or BUCO Falling Film Chillers.

On farms, milk comes from the cow at around 32°C and must be cooled to 4°C quickly, cost-effectively and without freezing. Rapid cooling of the milk counteracts bacterial growth and thus compliance with the strict milk hygiene regulations of the respective country, as well as providing the farmer with the highest possible selling price for his milk on the market.

The 32 °C cow's milk is pumped into a plate heat exchanger, which is fed with ice water from an ice storage tank or a trickle cooler. The milk is cooled very quickly in a single-stage process and leaves the respective heat exchanger at 2°C to 4°C to enter the insulated storage tank. Due to the low generated ice water temperature of 0.5°C, a cooling of 2°C to 4°C of the produced milk in the plate heat exchanger can be easily achieved. High heat transfer coefficients make this possible at high evaporating temperatures of T0= -3°C to -1°C in the falling film chiller, as well as T0= -8°C in our ice bank storage tank.

Dairy farms share a common problem: milk comes from the cow at a temperature of around 32°C and needs to be cooled to 4°C quickly, cheaply and without freezing. Slow cooling of the milk leads to increased bacterial growth, which affects both the price to the farmer and his ability to meet the increasingly stringent milk hygiene regulations of each country.

How has this been done so far?

The milk tanks on farms have a built-in cooling surface, but this is not sufficient for rapid cooling.  Much larger „booster“ cooling units with higher power consumption were needed for rapid cooling. This increased the power demand - and the costs for farmers. The solution: ice water is supplied either on demand from an ice storage system, which builds up and stores ice at convenient times to meet the daily load. In the process, electricity at a favourable rate can be used to shift demand from hours of high consumption. Or in the form of direct cooling, the ice water is produced by a Falling Film Chiller.

To the operation

One-step method

The 32 °C warm cow‘s milk is pumped into a plate heat exchanger, which is fed with ice water from an ice bank system or a falling film chiller.  The milk is cooled very quickly in a single-stage process and leaves the respective heat exchanger at 2 °C to 4 °C to enter the insulated storage tank.

Two-step procedure

If cold water is available from the mains, a pond or a cooling tower, the 32 °C warm milk is pre-cooled to about 20 °C in a two-stage plate heat exchanger using raw water and then reduced from 20 °C to 2 °C or 4 °C in the second stage using ice water from an ice bank system or a falling film chiller as before. To counteract the heat gain during storage, the cooling surface in the insulated storage tank can also be supplied with ice water.

We have always assimilated engineering science and thermodynamics optimally in the various manufacturing processes.

Thermodynamicists,mechanical engineers and welding engineers define the dimensioning, design and construction of customised heat exchanger panels and systems in materials ranging from mild and austenitic steels through to titanium, and ensure successful distribution of their work worldwide.

In doing so they fall back on production engineering expertise and calculations developed in the course of the past hundred years that are still being continuously optimised in an ongoing process.

In the perception of our customers, the Buco product stands for:

Technical and process-oriented consulting
Thermodynamic efficiency
Quality and longevity